Critical Race Studies Ninth Annual Symposium

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Please RSVP at their Facebook Event Page.

Critical Race Studies Ninth Annual Symposium

From Colorblindness to White Nationalism?: Emerging Racial Formations in the Trump Era


Donald Trump’s political rise has been marked, and fueled, by a resurgent and explicit white nationalism. This would have been significant even had he merely been nominated and come close to the presidency, rather than actually winning it. His victory, however, accelerates and deepens shifts in racial politics. Trump’s ascent seems new insofar as open assertions of white identity—and supremacy—conflict with the nominal commitments to colorblind ideology previously asserted from the center-left to the right. Moreover, the pivot toward an intersectionally white, masculinist nationalism seems to have disrupted neoliberal orthodoxy with regard to government spending and market regulation, from infrastructure to trade. And yet, this new racial politics also has been cast as a reaction to “political correctness” and reflects continuity with the mobilization of white racial resentment against affirmative action and all forms of race conscious remediation, both staples of colorblind ideology. And critics long have argued that neoliberal politics already were deeply bound to racialized state violence.

Our first Critical Race Studies Symposium of the Trump era provides an opportunity to articulate and interrogate these seeming contradictions. To what extent are we witnessing the emergence of a new racial formation in the United States, the extension of deeply entrenched trajectories, or both? What relationships can we discern amongst Trump’s most overtly racialized appeals – against Latinos in the name of immigration enforcement and sexual paternalism, against African Americans in the name of “law and order” and stop-and-frisk policing, against Muslims in the name of anti-terrorism and Christian national identity, and against Native Americans and Native sovereignty in the name of resource development? And how do these bear on his (white masculinist?) “economic” policies with respect to trade, infrastructure, and manufacturing, his approach to elections and “good government,” to foreign policy, and to the juxtaposition of LGBTQ rights retrenchment and emerging homonationalism?

Note that registration is required for attendance; however, seating will be on a first come basis, so please arrive early to guarantee space.
To register, go to: http://law.ucla.edu/centers/social-policy/critical-race-studies/events/2017-annual-symposium/register-donate/

For more info, go to: www.law.ucla.edu/crssymposium

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